April top reads

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I really meant not to read any fiction this month, and not doing so forced my imagination to find other ways to occupy itself, giving rise to a new novel that I’m now working on. But about three weeks into the month my addiction to other people’s words overwhelmed me and sent me trawling through my bookshelves, where I found three old favorites and, to my delight, one that’s been there so long that I was sure I must have read it, only when I opened it up it turned out to be a brand new treasure! 

Everything I read and watched is, as always, reviewed here. (For last year’s reviews, go here.) I have only two recommendations this month – but each is bigger than one book.

  • The Discworld Series, by Terry Pratchett – fantasy, humor trending toward satire. From 1983 to his recent death, Pratchett wrote 40 novels in this series, and they are all wonderful. His fans have different opinions regarding the order in which to read them, but I favor reading them in the order they were written. Start with The Color of Magic and The Light Fantastic, which are considerably simpler and more lightweight than the subsequent books but provide a good introduction to the Discworld.
  • Regency romances by Georgette Heyer – not for feminists who take themselves too seriously, or for romance readers who require heaving bosoms and throbbing thighs, but if you enjoy well-crafted characters, clever dialogue, consistent and carefully-researched insight into the period, and unpredictable story-lines, you’ll probably love Heyer. (She also wrote mysteries, which I enjoy less; they haven’t worn as well, in my opinion.)

The best of the month’s movies were…

  • The Imitation Game – based on historical facts, a heartbreaking story in the context of a tense thriller
  • Chef – clever and poignant, it falls short of being a great movie but is nonetheless well worth watching 

I definitely am more creatively productive if I’m not drowning out my own stories with those told by other people, so will continue to limit my reading at least until my book gains more traction. But not reading at all? Nah, that’s not gonna fly!

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About Belladonna Took

Into my second half-century and still trying to figure out what to be when I grow up. Born South African, naturalized American, at constant risk of losing my balance and landing ass-first in the Atlantic. A wife, a mom, a daughter and sister, kind of a grandma. Until recently a full-time dog rescuer, now more concerned with rescuing myself. User of dog hair as accessory, decor and garnish. Technical writer, strategic thinker, occasional entrepreneur. Voiceless poet and storyteller. Born again Christ-follower and former missionary schoolteacher chewing on some uncomfortable questions. Ignorer of rules, challenger of assumptions, believer in miracles. Skeptical libertarian, equal opportunity despiser of politicians and assholes. Gonnabe gardener, wannabe beekeeper, Monsanto-hating tree-hugger. Morbidly obese chocaholic, with a horse I don't ride because I might break him, and if not he would probably break me.

6 responses »

  1. I keep trying, on and off, not to read. I was away on a retreat at the weekens and didn’t read a word – but that didn’t last once I got home. It’s just so hard!

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    • I agree! And of course reading is a good thing that can be wonderfully stimulating to the imagination, and a good way to learn how to write better. But when it takes over, not so good.

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  2. I loved The Imitation Game. I think it’s my favorite movie of the year so far. The Woman in Gold is very good, too.

    Thanks for visiting my site. Much appreciated!

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